A Dog’s Teeth & Tiger’s Roar (1)
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Dog’s Teeth Range is not for the faint-hearted

Perched at a dizzying 539 metres above sea level, Kau Nga Ling is not for the faint-hearted. 

Colloquially termed “Dog’s Teeth Range”, the mountainous ridges are marked by three especially sharp points – West Dog Teeth, Middle Dog Teeth and East Dog Teeth. 

Dense foliage, loose boulders, shifting dirt and narrow pathways mark the area as one of the most dangerous hiking trails in Hong Kong. 

The journey began at the entrance to the Lantau Shek Pik Country Trail. 

The path continuing to my destination was marked by a sign warning of the dangers up ahead. 

I followed a kindly middle-aged couple up the route. Every so often, we passed by a tree garlanded with colourful ribbons to assure hikers that they were still on the correct path.

I saw Tiger Roar Rock River well before I reached it, a gaping vertical drop comprised of piercing rocks that are stinging to the sight. So named for the thunderous sound the rocks make when they fall, even when it is still, Tiger Roar has an intimidating presence, much like the calmness of the creature it is named after. The final route into Tiger Roar is a slender path named The Lifeline due to its challenging nature. 

Preferring familiar paths over new ones, especially in the afternoon heat, I headed back the way I came. As the journey to Tiger Roar was mostly uphill, the trip back was mostly downhill. 

Text & Photos Victoria Mae Martyn