New Horizons: Ways of Seeing HK Art in the ‘80s & ‘90s (1)
New Horizons: Ways of Seeing HK Art in the ‘80s & ‘90s (2)
New Horizons: Ways of Seeing HK Art in the ‘80s & ‘90s (3)
New Horizons: Ways of Seeing HK Art in the ‘80s & ‘90s (4)
New Horizons: Ways of Seeing HK Art in the ‘80s & ‘90s (5)
New Horizons: Ways of Seeing HK Art in the ‘80s & ‘90s (6)
New Horizons: Ways of Seeing HK Art in the ‘80s & ‘90s (7)
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The city was searching for identity, and its artists took to task

Hong Kong in the 1980s and 1990s was a city at a crossroads – waving goodbye to its past as a British colony and hello to its future with the People’s Republic of China. Under the “one country, two systems” policy, Hong Kong had time to develop an identity for itself that was removed from its colonial past. The city wasted no time. Its laissez-faire, free-market capitalism ensured the city’s meteoric rise on the global stage. Milton Friedman even called Hong Kong “the one true capitalist economy”.

While the city’s financiers were building their portfolios, its artists used whatever they had at their disposal to capture the spirit of the times as Hong Kong approached new horizons.

The installation ‘the photographic journey’, by Joseph Fung, showcase his artistic journey through the years including post-1979 China and his experimentation with Polaroids and digital images. Never one to stay within conventional boundaries, Fung’s work encapsulates the changing moods of each era and space, expressing the look and feel of the moment through its people and local architecture.

Text & Photos Victoria Mae Martyn