Whampoa Station (1)
Whampoa Station (2)
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Whampoa Station (10)
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History and Imagination – Whampoa

In this continuation of our serial, we examine admire the art along the Kwun Tong Line. Even without art training, you may find it can mentally and emotionally transport you to a better place. This includes helping you feel nostalgic, tranquil, blessed, happy, joyful, and accepted.

Lam Tung-pang’s collages, two of which are in Whampoa Station, invoke nostalgia for the shared memories of the people, buildings and landscape of Whampoa and Hung Hom. Lam has incorporated the old China Light and Power coastal power plant with its distinctive smokestack, farmers’ fields, mountains, a recognizable city map and a juxtaposition of old and new buildings. He has not restricted himself to a unified scale or a central point of view. Instead, the multiple points of perspective enlarge the visual field and provide a different frame of reference. This wider scope is essential for audiences, as they can see something familiar as they walk along the length of the collages while they travel through the station platform.

Lam’s work seems to draw inspiration from nineteenth-century Japanese woodblock prints, particularly those by Japanese ukiyo-o artist Katsushika Hokusai. The ocean waves, the oarsman in Lam’s boat and the stylization of the other characters appear to pay special homage to Hokusai’s most famous woodblock print The Great Wave off Kanagawa.